North Carolina, Craigmont, Corundrum

Almost no one in the industry of mineral prospecting is more reputable than William Divine. He has a long history of success in mineral prospecting that few people can match. His twenty years of experience certainly have something to do with that impressive record, but it also has much to do with his personal integrity and commitment to a tough work ethic. Divine has worked on four separate continents during his twenty years of mineral prospecting–Australia, Asia, North America, and Africa.

Corundrum is a mineral which is essentially just a crystallized form of Aluminum Oxide. However, it also contains traces of chromium, titanium, and iron. It is a naturally occuring, clear, mineral. On occasion, though, impurities do appear. When this happens, colors can manifest themselves in corundrum. The various hues that can exist in corundrum include gray, yellow, blue, green, orange, brown, gray, and colorless–as well as plenty of other colors.

Corundrum is an incredibly hard mineral. It is therefore capable of scratching or cutting virtually any other mineral, with diamonds being one of the most obvious exceptions. Corundrum is often used as an abrasive–which is to say that it is often used as a material placed on something in order to make it cut something else by design. Sandpaper is a good example of a commercial product in which corundrum is used as an abrasive.

The countries that currently mine a good deal of corundrum are Russia, Zimbabwe, and India. North Carolina, in the United States, and Craigmont, in Canada, have historically been prolific sources of corundrum.

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